Could Gold Reach $10K?

I’m very impressed with the recent gold action because it’s holding its own in the face of an impending rate hike. It’s fallen off a bit, but not dramatically. It tells you there are good fundamentals behind it, independent of the threat of a stronger dollar.

I believe the Fed is preparing to raise into weakness and will have to reverse course in April or May. What happens to gold then? It’s going to go higher again, because the Fed will cheapen the dollar, and that’s very bullish for gold. So I expect gold to take off in the Spring and finish the year very strongly. It could challenge $1,300 or $1,400.

Now, as many of my readers know, my long-term forecast is for $10,000 gold. We’re obviously not there now. So how do I arrive at $10,000?

I want to give the basis for that forecast. I never give any forecast without giving the analysis behind it. Anybody can pull a prediction out of a hat. If you don’t have the analysis to back it up, I’m not interested.

So let’s go through the math, because there is a solid mathematical basis for $10,000 gold. It’s actually the implied non-deflationary price of gold under a gold standard.

The combined M1 money supply in the world is about 24 trillion dollars. That includes the United States, China, the Eurozone and Japan. Those four entities combine for over 70% of global GDP.

Now, the official gold in the world is about 33,000 tons. That’s not counting private gold, because private gold is not part of the money supply.

So if you wanted to restore a gold standard, how much gold do you need to back up the money supply? My estimate is about 40%.

Historically, central banks have run successful gold standards with less backing. In the 19th century, for example, the Bank of England only had about 20% gold backing. In most of the 20th century, the U.S. had 40% gold backing.

I use the higher number, 40%, because I think a higher number might be needed to restore confidence in event of a collapse. The point is, 40% is a debatable, but reasonable figure.

Many people say there’s not enough gold to support the money supply. That’s one of the objections to gold standard. But my answer is that’s nonsense. There’s always enough gold to support the money supply. It’s a question of price.

Now, if you back 40% of the $24 trillion of money supply with the amount of official gold, it implies a gold price around $9,000 an ounce. But I predict $10,000.

So how do I arrive at $10,000 an ounce?

That’s because I expect central banks to print a lot more money by the time this issue comes to a head. So, by the time the printing presses stop running around the world, that $9,000 number will likely be in the range of $10,000.

The point is, $10,000 an ounce is not pie in the sky. It’s not a number I pulled out of a hat to get headlines. It’s the actual mathematical implied non-deflationary price of gold. If you reintroduced a gold standard at a lower price, it would be deflationary. They’d have to reduce the money supply in order to bring it into alignment with the price of gold.

So I expect $10,000 is where gold will have to be, given the amount of official gold and the projected amount of printed money to give it 40% gold backing.

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